This Week in Travel: August 7

Slovenia

A roundup of COVID-19-related updates, including closures and reopenings.

Looking for the latest travel news from around the world? You’ve come to the right place. 

Each week, we’re rounding up the top headlines and news stories to help you stay in the loop on all things travel. From tourism reopenings to restriction updates, we’re here to help keep you informed on the latest. 

Here’s what you need to know from the past week:

The U.S. Has Lifted Its Global “Do Not Travel” Advisory

After over four months, the Department of State is no longer advising U.S. citizens to avoid all international travel.

On August 6, the State Department lifted its global travel advisory, which was put in place March 19 due to the Covid-19 pandemic. The Level 4 advisory — the highest level of travel advisory — urged all U.S. citizens against international travel.

The decision to lift it was made in coordination with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the State Department said in a press release posted to its website, adding that it would continue to follow guidance from the CDC.

“The Department is returning to our previous system of country-specific levels of travel advice (with levels from 1-4 depending on country-specific conditions), in order to give travelers detailed and actionable information to make informed travel decisions,” officials said. 

American travellers considering taking off abroad should review the entire travel advisory for their destination at Travel.State.gov.

To read the full release, head here.

Sri Lanka To Reopen This Month

With new health and safety measures in place, here’s what travellers can expect.

After pushing back its reopening date from August 1, the South Asian country is preparing to open mid-August with new safety guidelines and precautionary measures. 

To enter, travellers must:

  • Commit to a minimum stay of five nights.
  • Obtain a tourist visa before arrival (cost US$100/€88.46).
  • Show proof of a negative Covid-19 PCR test (taken within 72 hours of landing).
  • Submit a Health Declaration Form (HDF) at the arriving airport.
  • Undergo a PCR test (free of charge):
    • Upon arrival at the airport.
    • 5-7 days after arrival or if respiratory symptoms are developed (whichever comes first).
    • 10-12 days after arrival (for travellers staying longer than 10 days).

Visitors will not have to quarantine unless they are showing symptoms. If any traveller is tested positive for Covid-19, they will be sent to a hospital or a quarantine hotel and will be charged at the rate of US$100 per night. 

For more information on travel to Sri Lanka, visit here!

Bermuda’s Offering a One-Year Residency Program to Remote Workers

Tired of working from home? You could work from the beaches of Bermuda for a year with their new residency certificate.

Becoming the most recent destination to welcome long-term, remote workers, Bermuda’s government is now offering one-year residencies for people wishing to work or study remotely from the island.⁠

Applications opened August 1 and can be submitted directly on the government’s website. In order to be eligible, applicants must be over the age of 18, have valid health insurance, and supply proof of employment or enrolment in an educational program. ⁠

“The trend towards remote working has been accelerated by COVID-19,” said Bermuda’s labour minister, Hon. Jason Hayward. “These visitors can reside in Bermuda without seeking employment on the island and will promote economic activity for our country without displacing Bermudians in the workforce.”⁠

According to the government’s website, Bermuda has also extended the tourist visa from the typical 90 days to 180 days.⁠

To read more about the new initiative, visit here.

Slovenia Is Reopen With a ‘Traffic-Light’ Colour Coding System

There are different restrictions for travellers arriving from the red, yellow, and green lists.

Slovenia has reopened its borders and lifted restrictions on travellers, developing a ‘traffic light’ system that categorizes countries into different colours based on their level of risk. ⁠

Each colour has different entry requirements for arrivals, outlined below:⁠

🚦 Green List: Travellers can enter without testing or quarantine. Countries on the green list have recently been updated to include Canada, Australia, Georgia, New Zealand, and Monaco (all previously on the yellow list).⁠

🚦 Yellow List: Citizens of Slovenia entering from a yellow country can do so without needing to quarantine on arrival. For other travellers, a 14-day quarantine is mandatory, though there are some exceptions.⁠

🚦 Red List: Anyone entering Slovenia from a country on this list — regardless of citizenship or residency status — has to undergo a mandatory 14-day quarantine period, with some exceptions.⁠

To see the full list of countries and the exceptions mentioned above, head here.

Seychelles Reopened Its Borders on August 1

The East African islands have reopened to visitors from “low and medium risk” countries.

As of August 1, Seychelles has reopened its borders to commercial flights and welcoming visitors from a list of “low and medium risk” countries.

The list of “low risk” countries includes China, Iceland, Monaco, New Zealand, and Norway. On the list of “medium risk” countries are Canada, Belgium, France, Germany, and Spain.

Travellers from these countries will need to:⁠

  • Have proof of a negative Covid-19 PCR test from an authorized lab, taken no more than 72 hours of travel. Only those coming from a “low risk” country have the option of using a Rapid Antigen test as an alternative.⁠
  • Send negative test results, flight, and accommodation details to the Public Health Authority via email.⁠
  • Submit test results to their respective airlines for verification.⁠
  • Ensure that their accommodation bookings are made only at licensed accommodation establishments or liveaboards that have been certified by the Public Health Authority.⁠
  • Have valid travel insurance with full medical coverage for the duration of their trip.⁠

Interested in seeing the full list of countries or learning more about Seychelles’ policies? Simply head here.

Qatar Reopened to International Travel

Travellers from countries deemed low-risk are required to take tests upon arrival and self-quarantine for one week.

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Qatar will begin reopening its borders to international travellers on August 1. ⁠ ⁠ The country’s Government Communications Office announced that arrivals from “low-risk countries” will be required to take a Covid-19 test upon arrival at the airport. In addition, travellers will have to sign a formal pledge to agree to self-quarantine for 7 days.⁠ ⁠ On day 5 or 6, travellers will have to be tested again through an appointment at a designated health centre. If the test comes back negative, their quarantine period will end after the seventh day. If the test returns positive, travellers will be transferred to a government facility for isolation.⁠ ⁠ The list of countries deemed low-risk can be found on the Ministry of Public Health’s website and include Canada, Australia, United Kingdom, Germany, Greece, and Turkey. ⁠ ⁠ Those arriving from countries not on the list will have to obtain a "virus-free certificate" from an accredited Covid-19 testing facility no more than 48 hours before travelling. Additionally, they will have to follow the home quarantine policies when they arrive in Qatar, while also adhering to the policy and conditions applied to arrivals from the low-risk countries mentioned above.⁠ ⁠ To learn more about Qatar’s reopening, head to the link in our bio.⁠ ⁠ We’d love to hear about your experiences travelling to Qatar! 👇 To see more photos of @sallyargote’s experience there, just swipe ➡️ !⁠ ⁠ 📷: @sallyargote

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Qatar reopened its borders to international travellers on August 1. ⁠

The country’s Government Communications Office announced that arrivals from “low-risk countries” will be required to take a Covid-19 test upon arrival at the airport. In addition, travellers will have to sign a formal pledge to agree to self-quarantine for 7 days.⁠

On day 5 or 6, travellers will have to be tested again through an appointment at a designated health centre. If the test comes back negative, their quarantine period will end after the seventh day. If the test returns positive, travellers will be transferred to a government facility for isolation.⁠

The list of countries deemed low-risk can be found on the Ministry of Public Health’s website and include Canada, Australia, United Kingdom, Germany, Greece, and Turkey. ⁠

Those arriving from countries not on the list will have to obtain a “virus-free certificate” from an accredited Covid-19 testing facility no more than 48 hours before travelling. Additionally, they will have to follow the home quarantine policies when they arrive in Qatar, while also adhering to the policy and conditions applied to arrivals from the low-risk countries mentioned above.⁠

To learn more about Qatar’s reopening, visit here.

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